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Art, Ecology, Resistance 2016

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2015 was recorded to be the hottest year in the history of mankind. Meanwhile the recent typhoon Yolanda was tagged to be the strongest storm, which has already been exceeded by other storms from other countries. Changes in weather patterns has become unexplainably irregular. These are the symptoms of Climate Change, which is for the most part caused by human activity.

People had invented technology that rely on limited sources such as minerals from underground. The act of taking and processing materials like these causes substantial amount of carbon, which heats up the planet at a faster rate. This heat affects the whole world. A cold place snows up easier, while hot places dry up more more easily. It also storms more often in places where rain usually falls. Sadly, this kind of deluge hits developing countries often.

To avoid coming up with real solutions, the system of paying carbon-credit was invented. This is a system where industrialized countries pay developing countries for the purpose of caring for their forest. This is a band-aid solution that only tolerates the unsustainable emission of other countries.

Meanwile in December 2015, a Climate Summit was launched in Paris, France to confront the problems which, thanks to our doing, Climate Change caused. The leaders of various countries convened and agreed to lessen carbon emmisions. They allotted how much to cut off from their respective discharges. However, there were other countries that that did not take part. Aside from that, there is no international mandate that will be the basis of apprehending the trangressors.

In connection to this, the Philippines committed to minimize carbon emissions by 70 percent until year 2030. This is aside from the plan to put up another 67 coal-fired powerplants (27 has already been started), and the grievances of communities who are directly affected. These communities lose their lands to plants and mines that are supported by the government. Mining and energy seem to be a huge industry in the Philippines.

Filipinos primarily obtain coal as source of electricity. Coal that the Phiippines imports from other countries like Indonesia, which are also penetrated by companies from Europe and North America. Those companies, mostly private, are the same sources of coal-fired powerplants in the Philippines. These plants supply homes. But most of the energy go to the mines, which supply raw materials to countries that are highly industrialized. By putting up coal-fired powerplants, it is claimed that shortage of energy may be resolved. In reality, most of the energy being utilized by the country supplies huge industries such as malls and bypass the national grid.

To call attention to the issue of mining and energy, groups and individuals chose to launch Sining Kalikasan Aklasan, which focuses on this topic. This is an issue which involves the richest people, those who live in the city that benefit from mining, the government, the poorest who buy from the latter electricity and oil, and communities that are deprived of space and life. Because change does not come from those who benefit from the current system and institutions, and so, the people themselves are encouraged to start this change

Sining Kalikasan Akalasan is a venue where anyone can share knowledge and be inspired. This is horizontally organized by various groups and scenes including artists, musicians, performance artists, spiritualists, anarchists, permaculturists and other more. This was formed through the initiative of others to present alternative solutions and practices that are connected to the everyday problems that people face as part of the earth. These are practices that exist in many places, other countries, in our archipleago, especially the indigenous people who have a deep connection with nature.

 

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